Hate speech records are having ‘chilling effect’ on free speech

Allegations of hate speech made against 120,000 people have been logged by police, prompting criticism that they have diverted attention from forces tackling other priorities, such as violent crime.

Campaigners added that logging “non-crime hate incidents”, even after police had decided that what had been said or posted online had broken no laws, had a “chilling effect” on free speech.

In response to a Freedom of Information (FoI) request, none of the 43 police forces in England and Wales could cite any crime that had been prevented and 20 said that they did not have a system to monitor the effectiveness of recording the claims.

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Police log 120,000 ‘hate reports’ – but not ONE is a crime – as top cops defend system which helps ‘measure tensions’

  • Police cannot identify a single crime that has been prevented by recording hate-speech allegations
  • Critics say controversial practice of logging ‘non-crime hate incidents’ has a ‘chilling effect on free speech’
  • Senior officers insist it helps them ‘prevent serious hostility and violence’

Police have recorded hate-speech allegations against more than 120,000 people – yet cannot identify a single crime that has been prevented by the exercise.

Critics say the controversial practice of logging ‘non-crime hate incidents’, even after officers decided what was said or posted online did not break any laws, has a ‘chilling effect on free speech’.

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The British Twitter Stasi

When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 it took with it the East German State security force known as the ‘Stasi’. At the time of its demise, the Stasi employed 91,015 people and relied on 173,081 informants. This works out as one secret police officer for every 166 East Germans, making the Gestapo look like lazy amateurs with their trifling one per 2,000. The Stasi were dangerous because of their embrace of ‘Zersetzung’  (‘decomposition’ or ‘biodegradation’). The aim of ‘Zersetzung’ was to destroy the psychological integrity of an individual, by gathering information to damage their reputation and their personal relationships.

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Stirring up divisions in private homes ‘could become hate crime’

Hate speech in private homes could become a crime, according to reports. The Law Commission, an independent body that reviews England Wales’ law and recommends reforms, has argued that the ‘private dwelling’ defence, which stops people being convicted of stirring up division because their actions were in private places, should be removed from the Public Order Act.

Harry Miller, former police officer and co-founder of anti-hate-crime laws organisation and pro-freedom of speech advocates Fair Cop, said the Law Commission’s recommendation ‘is a direct threat to the sanctity of the family home.’

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UK lawyers uneasy about plan to prosecute hate speech at home

Proposals to prosecute individuals for hate crimes based on what they discuss in their own homes need to be more widely debated, free speech organisations have said.

The suggestion to remove the “dwelling” privacy exemption from criminal legislation is buried in a few paragraphs of the Law Commission’s 544-page consultation on hate crime published in September.

The proposal was spotted by the organisation Fair Cop, which campaigns against what it says is misuse of legislation to curb free speech. Sarah Phillimore, a barrister and member of the organisation, said it would encourage “state surveillance or people to inform on their friends. How else would they get the evidence? It will be like the East German Stasi security service.”

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DINNER CRIME Talking about race, religion or sex over dinner table at home could become a HATE CRIME

TALKING about race, religion or sex over the dinner table at home could soon become a HATE crime, says a report.

The Law Commission claims the offence of “stirring up” division should be extended into private homes.

According to the Daily Mail, the Commission has drawn up a 500-page consultation report which will be presented to ministers next year.

Harry Miller, a businessman, former policeman and founder of Fair Cop, which opposes hate crime rules, told the Mail: “If the private home law is adopted by Government, a comment over the dinner table about a huge range of people could lead to a prison sentence.”

 

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Lawyers call for ministers to consider making hate speech illegal at dinner table

Lawyers are calling on the Government to consider making hate speech illegal at the dinner table.

The Law Commission has proposed that the crime of stirring up hatred on the grounds of race, religion or sexual orientation should be extended to private homes.

A 500-page consultation report on reforming hate crime laws will be handed to ministers next year.

However, opponents of the rules branded the move ‘neo-Marxist’ and fear it could land people in jail for making a comment at the dinner table.

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