My fight against the police over ‘transphobic’ tweets

The police have no jurisdiction over our thoughts, but that hasn’t stopped them trying recently. Just over a year ago, a plainclothes officer from Humberside Police turned up at my workplace to ‘check my thinking’ for getting involved in the transgender debate online. An individual had taken offence at something I’d retweeted and reported it as a hate crime.

The crime in question? Well, it was retweeting a silly song lyric that brought the complaint, but the subsequent police investigation found another 30 ‘transphobic’ tweets I’d made. As a former police officer myself, I considered the force’s intrusion to be deeply Orwellian.

Read article: My fight against the police over ‘transphobic’ tweets

Read more

Harry Miller: Police probe into ‘transphobic’ tweets unlawful

The police response to an ex-officer’s allegedly transphobic tweets was unlawful, the High Court has ruled.

Harry Miller was visited by Humberside Police at work in January last year after a complaint about his tweets.

He was told he had not committed a crime, but it would be recorded as a non-crime “hate incident”.

The court found the force’s actions were a “disproportionate interference” with his right to freedom of expression.

Read article: Harry Miller: Police probe into ‘transphobic’ tweets unlawful

Read more

Police who warned man about ‘transphobic’ tweet acted unlawfully

High court finds actions of Humberside police had ‘chilling effect’ on Harry Miller’s right to free speech

Police officers unlawfully interfered with a man’s right to freedom of expression by turning up at his place of work to speak to him about allegedly “transphobic” tweets, the high court has ruled.

Harry Miller, a former police officer who founded the campaign group Fair Cop, said the actions of Humberside police had a “substantial chilling effect” on his right to free speech.

Read article: Police who warned man about ‘transphobic’ tweet acted unlawfully

Read more

‘It takes ordinary people to stand up and say no’: Harry Miller on his landmark free speech case against the police

Mr Miller won a legal challenge against Humberside Police after they recorded a ‘non-crime hate incident’ against him

When Harry Miller took his oath to join the police in 1989, he – like all aspiring officers – pledged to operate to the best of his ability without fear or favour.

“What’s happened now is that the police have started operating in fear and with favour,” Mr Miller said. “We need a return to how it used to be.”

Mr Miller today won a landmark legal challenge against Humberside Police after they recorded a ‘non-crime hate incident’ against him for sharing an allegedly “transphobic” limerick on social media.

Read article: ‘It takes ordinary people to stand up and say no’: Harry Miller on his landmark free speech case against the police

Read more

Judge criticises police response to ‘transphobic’ tweets

(Originally titled: Don’t behave like Gestapo over ‘transphobic’ tweets, warns judge)

A former constable has vowed to take his fight against the police’s professional body to the Supreme Court after a judge warned his former force against behaving like the Gestapo.

Harry Miller said he would continue his fight for freedom of expression after a landmark legal challenge against the College of Policing and Humberside police.

Mr Miller accused the police of being politicised, saying that they had allowed themselves to be driven by the pro-transgender lobby including groups such as Stonewall, Mermaids and Gendered Intelligence.

Mr Justice Julian Knowles said that the police’s actions towards Mr Miller, 55, “disproportionately interfered with his right of freedom of expression” after officers visited him at work over tweets he had posted about transgender people.​

Read article: Judge criticises police response to ‘transphobic’ tweets

Read more

Harry Miller: Police unlawfully interfered with freedom of expression over ‘transphobic’ tweets

The former officer hails “a watershed moment for liberty” following a High Court ruling on Humberside Police’s actions.

A police force unlawfully interfered with a man’s right to freedom of expression by turning up at his place of work over his allegedly “transphobic” tweets, a judge has ruled.

Harry Miller, a 54-year-old former police officer and now docker from Humberside, founded campaign group Fair Cop following the action against him over his Twitter posts.

Read article: Harry Miller: Police unlawfully interfered with freedom of expression over ‘transphobic’ tweets

Read more
+