Other media coverage of the Judicial Review judgment

Ex-cop’s ‘transphobic’ tweets deemed lawful after High Court battle | Metro News

Police probe into former officer Harry Miller’s tweets about transgender people was ‘disproportionate’, High Court judge rules | London Evening Standard

Former police officer’s ‘transphobic’ tweets ruled lawful by High Court – LBC

Transgender tweets were freedom of speech, British judge rules – Reuters

Cops who visited businessman, 54, at work over ‘transphobic’ tweets acted unlawfully – The Sun

Local media

Humberside Police ‘learning’ after officers quizzed Fair Cop founder Harry Miller over ‘transphobic’ tweet – Hull Live

Fair Cop founder Harry Miller in partial court win over transgender ‘hate incidents’ involving Humberside Police – Hull Live

Humberside Police condemned by judge for ‘Gestapo’ style investigation into transgender tweet – Grimsby Live

Harry Miller: ‘If the police come knocking say: ‘Miller v Humberside Police, b****r off” – Hull Live

Former policeman from Lincolnshire wins freedom of speech battle at High Court over alleged transphobic comments posted on Twitter – Lincolnshire Live

Further afield

UK judge: Police probe of ‘transphobic’ tweets was unlawful – The Washington Post

UK judge: Police probe of ‘transphobic’ tweets was unlawful – ABC News

Police probe of ‘transphobic’ tweets was unlawful: U.K. judge | CTV News

And finally…

Harry Miller: Police officer’s ‘transphobic’ tweets were lawful, court rules

 

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A pushback against trans activism in Britain

Three groups of people have applied for judicial reviews

For some years now, schools, the nhs and the police have been accommodating the needs and concerns of transgender people. gids, Britain’s only gender identity clinic for children, based at the Tavistock nhs trust, has been making it easier for trans teenagers to transition medically. But now some critics of the moves are pushing back, claiming that gids is giving children puberty blockers too liberally, and that attempts by other bodies such as the police to combat transphobia are leading to an attack on free speech.

Three groups of people have recently applied for judicial reviews, the legal means to challenge public bodies. On January 22nd, a 23-year-old woman, Keira Bell (pictured), joined one of these lawsuits. She charges that gids is performing “experimental” treatment on children by giving puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones to more than 1,000 children and teenagers, including herself, some as young as 11. She had a double mastectomy, and subsequently detransitioned.

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Ex-officer in transgender tweet case says he received threats

A former constable at the centre of a landmark legal case over tweets that he sent about transgender people has revealed that he and his family have been threatened with rape and murder.

Harry Miller, 55, was visited last year by police from Humberside, his former force, and told that he would be recorded as having carried out a “hate incident” over a series of tweets about transgender people, including a limerick that he had retweeted which questioned whether transgender women were biological women.

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Ex-cop accused over hate limerick on Twitter speaks out

A man involved in a landmark legal case relating to a “non-crime hate incident” says that officers began acting as “thought police” out of the best of intentions.

Harry Miller, 55, from Lincolnshire, was told by an officer a verse he had posted about transgender people on Twitter would be recorded as a “hate incident” under the College of Policing’s guidelines.

Speaking ahead of the judgment on the case, which is expected early next month, he said: “I am pro-police. I do not think that the people in the police force have looked at this and thought how can we become totalitarian?

Read article: Ex-cop accused over hate limerick on Twitter speaks out

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Police forces record thousands of hate incidents each year even though they accept they are not crimes

Police forces are recording thousands of hate incidents even though they accept that they are not crimes.

More than 87,000 ‘non-crime hate incidents’ have been recorded by 27 forces in England and Wales over the past five years, when the national policing body introduced its Hate Crime Operational Guidelines.

The guidelines state that an incident – perceived to be motivated by hostility towards religion, race or transgender identity – must be recorded “irrespective of whether there is any evidence to identify the hate element” and can even show up on an individual’s DBS check, despite them not committing a crime.

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Comedy in the era of Twitter outrage: An interview with Ricky Gervais

[Ricky Gervais] considers ‘hate speech’ to be the invention of those who ‘feel they shouldn’t have to hear something they don’t agree with, and want to complain. They can call the police because someone’s wearing a T-shirt they don’t like. This is actually happening.’

By way of illustration he mentions the recent case of Harry Miller, the ex-policeman who was investigated by Humberside police for retweeting a poem deemed to be transphobic. Miller is currently challenging the police investigation in court. ‘The judge reminded the court that freedom of speech outweighs the right never to hear something you don’t like.’

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In Britain, saying sex is immutable can be a sackable offence

A tribunal upholds the firing of an employee who had tweeted that men cannot become women

Fair Cop, a pressure-group set up by Mr Miller and others concerned about the way police deal with so-called “non-crime hate incidents” and especially statements deemed to be transphobic, expressed outrage at the ruling in Ms Forstater’s case. It went on: “Shocking as this judgment is, we welcome the fact that it unmasks the true demands of the trans-rights movement: that everybody in society must either believe in the falsehood that humans can change sex; or, at the very least, self-censor so that they appear to believe in it.

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Defining women

‘The wording of anti-trans hate-crime guidance is so vague, and so reliant on subjective interpretation, that it could be open to misuse by politically-motivated actors’

Criminals are on the march in Oxford. The details are unclear because the content of the supposedly offensive stickers are not “suitable for sharing”, according to Thames Valley Police. Some of them are known to feature a now-controversial dictionary entry: “Woman. Noun. Adult human female.” Also featured on billboards and T-shirts produced by gender-critical feminists, this common-sense statement is a transphobic dog whistle to the ever-alert trans activists.

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Must we all live in fear of a visit from the actual thought police?

A year or so ago, a friend insisted we move from Facebook Messenger to WhatsApp for our communications. The former was too easily hackable, she said, and she was worried that any off-colour comments – or indeed jokes – we might make about politics, life or individuals could end up being released to the world. I hate WhatsApp, but – suddenly feeling uneasy – I acquiesced.

At the time, I thought she was being paranoid. Now it has become abundantly clear that one cannot be too careful.

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Putting the thoughtpolice on trial

Previously unaware that Kafka and Orwell had written training manuals for police officers, Miller decided to bring a court case against the College of Policing, whose Hate Crime Operational Guidance (HCOG), issued in 2014, forms the basis of current practice. As Miller has argued at the High Court this week, ‘the idea that a law-abiding citizen can have their name recorded against a hate incident on a crime report when there was neither hate nor crime undermines principles of justice, free expression, democracy and common sense’.

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