Judge criticises police response to ‘transphobic’ tweets

(Originally titled: Don’t behave like Gestapo over ‘transphobic’ tweets, warns judge)

A former constable has vowed to take his fight against the police’s professional body to the Supreme Court after a judge warned his former force against behaving like the Gestapo.

Harry Miller said he would continue his fight for freedom of expression after a landmark legal challenge against the College of Policing and Humberside police.

Mr Miller accused the police of being politicised, saying that they had allowed themselves to be driven by the pro-transgender lobby including groups such as Stonewall, Mermaids and Gendered Intelligence.

Mr Justice Julian Knowles said that the police’s actions towards Mr Miller, 55, “disproportionately interfered with his right of freedom of expression” after officers visited him at work over tweets he had posted about transgender people.​

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Ex-officer in transgender tweet case says he received threats

A former constable at the centre of a landmark legal case over tweets that he sent about transgender people has revealed that he and his family have been threatened with rape and murder.

Harry Miller, 55, was visited last year by police from Humberside, his former force, and told that he would be recorded as having carried out a “hate incident” over a series of tweets about transgender people, including a limerick that he had retweeted which questioned whether transgender women were biological women.

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Ex-cop accused over hate limerick on Twitter speaks out

A man involved in a landmark legal case relating to a “non-crime hate incident” says that officers began acting as “thought police” out of the best of intentions.

Harry Miller, 55, from Lincolnshire, was told by an officer a verse he had posted about transgender people on Twitter would be recorded as a “hate incident” under the College of Policing’s guidelines.

Speaking ahead of the judgment on the case, which is expected early next month, he said: “I am pro-police. I do not think that the people in the police force have looked at this and thought how can we become totalitarian?

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Transgender tweet case: Officer Harry Miller says he was visited by ‘thought police’

Officers who record social media comments as hate incidents are unlawfully acting as “thought police” curbing freedom of expression, a former constable has claimed in a landmark legal case.

Harry Miller, a former constable with Humberside police, was visited by an officer from the force after posting a verse about transgender people on Twitter. In evidence to the High Court yesterday, he said that the officer, PC Mansoor Gul, told him: “I’m here to check your thinking.” Mr Miller, 54, said he was told he had not committed a crime but that his tweeting was being recorded as a “hate incident” under the College of Policing’s guidance and that his social media account would be monitored.

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High Court review for College of Policing guidance on hate crime

Police guidance on “hate incidents” is to be challenged in the High Court by a former officer who tweeted an allegedly transphobic limerick.

The case will be heard in November after the man was given approval yesterday to make his challenge.

Harry Miller, who was a constable in the 1990s, says that guidance to forces in England and Wales from the College of Policing results in a “chilling of free speech”. He claims that officers from his old force, Humberside police, warned him that a reference in a tweet to Jenni Murray, the Woman’s Hour presenter, could be transphobic.

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Police are criminalising opinions, say campaigners

People warned by the police over comments they made about transgender issues are launching a pressure group and legal action next week, challenging “Big Brother interference” with their free speech rights.

The Fair Cop campaign is headed by Harry Miller, 54, from Lincolnshire, who was visited at work in January by Humberside police for retweeting a limerick that said trans women had silicone breasts. The force admitted there was no crime, but described it as a “hate incident” and said it would be monitoring Miller’s and his wife’s social media accounts.

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